nonplussedbyreligion-deactivate
nonplussedbyreligion:


What you see in this graphic cartoon is the version of Christianity that believes we have been commissioned to go into all the world and make everybody just like us. Like zombies, it is a mindless and inhumane affair, obsessed with consuming everyone in its path. ~ David Hayward aka the naked pastor

Have I ever told you guys how much I love David Hayward.  It’s probably evident by the fact I post a lot of his work.  Just thought I’d say it again. ~ Kim

nonplussedbyreligion:

What you see in this graphic cartoon is the version of Christianity that believes we have been commissioned to go into all the world and make everybody just like us. Like zombies, it is a mindless and inhumane affair, obsessed with consuming everyone in its path. ~ David Hayward aka the naked pastor

Have I ever told you guys how much I love David Hayward.  It’s probably evident by the fact I post a lot of his work.  Just thought I’d say it again. ~ Kim

But getting back to the resurrection, there are problems with the story that emerge even before you talk about the contradictions, and the big one is this: what is being claimed is that a man came back from the dead. Right there, the story moves out of the realm of ordinary historical accounts (like “Caesar led his armies against the Gauls”), and into the realm of extraordinary claims. And extraordinary claims, as the saying goes, require extraordinary evidence. Most historians wouldn’t have a problem accepting accounts of Caesar’s military campaigns based on routine scholarship. But if someone started claiming that Caesar could teleport and frequently visited his Galactic Overlords at their secret base on Neptune to discuss battle plans, then you’ve got some red flags going up.

So the problem with the resurrection account is bigger than the problem faced by other, more conventional historical claims. Basically, it’s this: You have a book claiming a dead man who was actually a god returned to life after his execution, and the book itself is claimed to the be divinely inspired word of an infallible perfect deity, yet it contains confused and contradictory accounts despite this. For anyone not already so immersed in the faith that they’re beyond questioning its claims, you’re already into that “Caesar on Neptune” red flag zone even before you start talking about the specific contradictions.

-Excellent post for Easter. Check it out.